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About Literature / Hobbyist Michael HuntMale/United States Group :iconpsychotaku-manga: PsychOtaku-Manga
 
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  • Listening to: Heavy Day (Guilty Gear Xrd)
  • Reading: MHO info
  • Watching: Summer Wars
  • Playing: Monster Hunter Generations
  • Eating: Well-Done Steak
  • Drinking: mega-potions
So I recently came to learn about the game Six Days at Fallujah and the 'controversy' that followed with a quick abandonment under the pretense 'it's a game' thanks to Extra Credits and their video on Game Controversy.

(For those who don't know Extra Credits is a channel on YouTube that creates lecture videos on various aspects of game development and game design, and a fair amount of what's covered can be applied to other subjects as well.  By all means check them out.)

And after learning about the whole thing of 'it's a game' and the idea of people at first seeing games as a kind of toy it immediately got me thinking:

What's in a game?

Not as in what's IN a game but WHAT'S in a game.

Allow me to explain things.

Typically, the subject matter of a game will fall into one of three categories:

- A serious topic handled in a fictitious manner
- A fictitious topic handled in a fictitious manner
- A fictitious topic handled in a serious manner

An example of the first one would be the first Call of Duty game.  Actually, scratch that, a better example would be Spec Ops: The Line, which was a third person shooter set in a post-catastrophe Dubai where the player would have to rescue a specific individual.  Over the course of the game however there are several hallucinations and it forces the player to take note of the horrors of war by making many morally grey decisions over the course of play.  The game handles modern tactics and real threats in a fictitious way by using fake characters in real places facing potentially real problems.

The second one is easy.  Slime Rancher, Minecraft, Doom, all of these use a set of fictitious topics that are handled in a fictitious manner.  How do you manage to kill the Ender Dragon in Minecraft?  By finding a portal, creating several Ender Eyes, loading up on gear and heading to The End.  How do you defeat demons in Doom?  You shoot them until they die and then shoot them some more.  These are focused on fake things and are purely for entertainment and nothing really else.  You aren't supposed to take them seriously

The third one is a bit trickier.  But a good example is easily Dust: An Elysian Tail.  The game focuses on the story of the main character Dust as he tries to recover from his amnesia.  A fake character, but in a genuine situation that reacts genuinely to what goes on around him.

Now, the kicker is that there is actually a forth type.  A serious topic handled in a serious manner.  News, certain kinds of modern fiction, and even some artwork or music focus on real, serious things that can really, seriously happen and deal with them seriously.

But every time a video game tries to do this, like with Six Days at Fallujah, it's shot down in a massive controversy.  Why is that?

Some people think that it's because video games might need a better name to allow them to be taken more seriously, but I disagree.  I heard the argument that comics got respect when they changed to graphic novels, but that didn't really seem to happen either.

Graphic novels seem to often be there own thing entirely.  If anything, the term graphic novel came around about the same time manga started gaining popularity here in the US.  And I've seen graphic novels sat alongside comics sat alongside manga sharing a similar name but all being different.  Hell I owned a graphic novel that was a collection of the original Dark Phoenix Saga comics, and I do mean the original.

What changed wasn't the name of comics.  What changed was what people thought what a comic really was.  What was in a comic.  And what was categorized as a comic.  It became interchangeable.

There are several games out there now that are close to this already.  Paintball is a game at it's core, so are sports and definitely board and card games.  But video games get caught out for it.

And yet why?

So now I'd like to ask a favor, and for the first time it's about Twitter and hashtags.  Whenever you're on the topic of games, or you feel that people need to reconsider just what a game is, use the following hashtag:

#whatsinagame

I'd like to see people give them more thought.  They're more than just toys or entertainment.  They're experiences, just like any other game, and like any piece of work (novel, art, movie or otherwise) they are only limited by what we as a society limit them to.

I for one feel that Six Days at Fallujah should have been made, if only so more people knew about that battle and so that the troops who died could have their names honored.  The fact that people who lost relatives and actual survivors in that battle got behind this game really made me pause.

So ask yourself:

What's in a game?
13 deviations
  • Listening to: Heavy Day (Guilty Gear Xrd)
  • Reading: MHO info
  • Watching: Summer Wars
  • Playing: Monster Hunter Generations
  • Eating: Well-Done Steak
  • Drinking: mega-potions
So I recently came to learn about the game Six Days at Fallujah and the 'controversy' that followed with a quick abandonment under the pretense 'it's a game' thanks to Extra Credits and their video on Game Controversy.

(For those who don't know Extra Credits is a channel on YouTube that creates lecture videos on various aspects of game development and game design, and a fair amount of what's covered can be applied to other subjects as well.  By all means check them out.)

And after learning about the whole thing of 'it's a game' and the idea of people at first seeing games as a kind of toy it immediately got me thinking:

What's in a game?

Not as in what's IN a game but WHAT'S in a game.

Allow me to explain things.

Typically, the subject matter of a game will fall into one of three categories:

- A serious topic handled in a fictitious manner
- A fictitious topic handled in a fictitious manner
- A fictitious topic handled in a serious manner

An example of the first one would be the first Call of Duty game.  Actually, scratch that, a better example would be Spec Ops: The Line, which was a third person shooter set in a post-catastrophe Dubai where the player would have to rescue a specific individual.  Over the course of the game however there are several hallucinations and it forces the player to take note of the horrors of war by making many morally grey decisions over the course of play.  The game handles modern tactics and real threats in a fictitious way by using fake characters in real places facing potentially real problems.

The second one is easy.  Slime Rancher, Minecraft, Doom, all of these use a set of fictitious topics that are handled in a fictitious manner.  How do you manage to kill the Ender Dragon in Minecraft?  By finding a portal, creating several Ender Eyes, loading up on gear and heading to The End.  How do you defeat demons in Doom?  You shoot them until they die and then shoot them some more.  These are focused on fake things and are purely for entertainment and nothing really else.  You aren't supposed to take them seriously

The third one is a bit trickier.  But a good example is easily Dust: An Elysian Tail.  The game focuses on the story of the main character Dust as he tries to recover from his amnesia.  A fake character, but in a genuine situation that reacts genuinely to what goes on around him.

Now, the kicker is that there is actually a forth type.  A serious topic handled in a serious manner.  News, certain kinds of modern fiction, and even some artwork or music focus on real, serious things that can really, seriously happen and deal with them seriously.

But every time a video game tries to do this, like with Six Days at Fallujah, it's shot down in a massive controversy.  Why is that?

Some people think that it's because video games might need a better name to allow them to be taken more seriously, but I disagree.  I heard the argument that comics got respect when they changed to graphic novels, but that didn't really seem to happen either.

Graphic novels seem to often be there own thing entirely.  If anything, the term graphic novel came around about the same time manga started gaining popularity here in the US.  And I've seen graphic novels sat alongside comics sat alongside manga sharing a similar name but all being different.  Hell I owned a graphic novel that was a collection of the original Dark Phoenix Saga comics, and I do mean the original.

What changed wasn't the name of comics.  What changed was what people thought what a comic really was.  What was in a comic.  And what was categorized as a comic.  It became interchangeable.

There are several games out there now that are close to this already.  Paintball is a game at it's core, so are sports and definitely board and card games.  But video games get caught out for it.

And yet why?

So now I'd like to ask a favor, and for the first time it's about Twitter and hashtags.  Whenever you're on the topic of games, or you feel that people need to reconsider just what a game is, use the following hashtag:

#whatsinagame

I'd like to see people give them more thought.  They're more than just toys or entertainment.  They're experiences, just like any other game, and like any piece of work (novel, art, movie or otherwise) they are only limited by what we as a society limit them to.

I for one feel that Six Days at Fallujah should have been made, if only so more people knew about that battle and so that the troops who died could have their names honored.  The fact that people who lost relatives and actual survivors in that battle got behind this game really made me pause.

So ask yourself:

What's in a game?
  • Listening to: Something
  • Reading: Cirque Du Freak or Looking Glass Wars
  • Watching: Summer Wars
  • Playing: what I'm recording
  • Eating: I'm not quite sure
  • Drinking: caffeine (trying to quit)
Hi.

I probably have mentioned this to more or less EVERYONE that's ever thought it was a good idea to watch me here (sorry for updating never I know I suck) but I have a gaming channel on youtube!

It's actually been there or a while...so I have no idea why I'm mentioning this now...

ANYWAY

The point is that I actually have a channel for playing video games that I feel more people should play and such.  There's some Legend of Zelda, some M&L Superstar Saga, some Dust: An Elysian Tail, some Dead Space, and you can bet there'll be more coming too!

Here's a link to the channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCsedI…

Enjoy!  And sorry if I'm sort of tooting my horn or viewer fishing or anything like that.

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yugijak
Michael Hunt
Artist | Hobbyist | Literature
United States
Mainly, I am a writer, but I dabble a bit in artistry. I'm not that good, but maybe I can get help! I love books and fanfiction, and a few of my ideas have been commented by my friends as Zelda quality! Hope it works out!
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Add a Comment:
 
:iconwarnerrepublic:
WarnerRepublic Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Happy birthday, Michael. You're becoming another year greater and better. May the year of 2015 be a happy and healthy one for you and your love ones. God bless. :hug:
Reply
:iconjseedproductions:
JSeedProductions Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
Wait, wait, wait... My birthday is October 12, Girly-Dust-Artist's birthday is October 13... and your birthday is October 14!  OMG
How old will you be?! omfg
Reply
:iconyugijak:
yugijak Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Sorry for not answering sooner, 22.
Reply
:iconjseedproductions:
JSeedProductions Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
...so, now I'm 19, GDA is 26... and you're right in between!
Reply
:iconyugijak:
yugijak Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
GDA?
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconhowmanydragons:
HowManyDragons Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2015
Thanks for the +fav on my dragon sculptures! There are many more in my gallery, if you'd like to take a look. :) (Smile)
Reply
:iconjseedproductions:
JSeedProductions Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
Daxter's in your icon? WATCHING!
Reply
:iconthepenvsthesword:
ThePenVsTheSword Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2015  Student Writer
Thank you very much for the watch!
Reply
:iconblackbear972:
Blackbear972 Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thannks for favoriting!
Reply
:iconwarnerrepublic:
WarnerRepublic Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Happy birthday, Michael. You're becoming another year greater and better. May the year of 2014 be a happy and healthy one for you and your love ones. :hug: :hug:
Reply
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